tokyo camera style

Sep 20 2014
Yoyogi Park
Olympus Mju II 
Photographer: Carina Hsu / flickr

Yoyogi Park

Olympus Mju II 

Photographer: Carina Hsu / flickr

Sep 19 2014
A scan of the August 2014 Tokyo Camera Style monthly feature in Nippon Camera
My editor and I met up with photographer and founding member of Provoke, Yutaka Takanashi (right page) in Nakano.  His 1974 book Toshi-e is available through Errata Edition's Books on Books #6. 
Left page: I shared the story about the couple in the bottom right corner back in May the day it happened. The man above with the Widelux I ran into near the Tokyo Metro Museum of Photography. I liked that his camera was around his neck and not in his bag as he walked to the museum. The two photos on the left side were taken in Yoyogi Park right before a torrential rainstorm and at about the exact same time a man set himself on fire in Shinjuku. At the top is my pal Sean Marc Lee, an American photographer living in Taiwan.  You ought to follow him on tumblr, flickr, and check out his photography on his portfolio site. His girlfriend, Carina Hsu, is on Flickr too. Below the happy couple is American artist James Jean.

A scan of the August 2014 Tokyo Camera Style monthly feature in Nippon Camera

My editor and I met up with photographer and founding member of Provoke, Yutaka Takanashi (right page) in Nakano.  His 1974 book Toshi-e is available through Errata Edition's Books on Books #6

Left page: I shared the story about the couple in the bottom right corner back in May the day it happened. The man above with the Widelux I ran into near the Tokyo Metro Museum of Photography. I liked that his camera was around his neck and not in his bag as he walked to the museum. The two photos on the left side were taken in Yoyogi Park right before a torrential rainstorm and at about the exact same time a man set himself on fire in Shinjuku. At the top is my pal Sean Marc Lee, an American photographer living in Taiwan.  You ought to follow him on tumblr, flickr, and check out his photography on his portfolio siteHis girlfriend, Carina Hsu, is on Flickr too. Below the happy couple is American artist James Jean.

Sep 17 2014
Ebisu
Mamiya C220 with 65mm f4.5 lens
Photographer: Hitoshi Kanzaki website / flickr / tumblr
I ran into Kansaki at Ebisu Garden Place near the Tokyo Metro Museum of Photography. I took a snap of his camera and we started chatting. He said he was going to Gallery Poetic Scape for the OU-en The So Books event since that was where I was headed as well we moved out and talked some more. He told me he had an exhibition at the Nikon Salon in Shinjuku in January of his street photographs-  titled Our Street View and just happened to have his portfolio from the show on him. 
You can and should check out his series on his site here: Our Street View
While he mostly shoots film (check him out on Flickr), for his Our Street View series Kanzaki attaches a small digital camera to the right handle of his wheelchair pointed ahead over his shoulder. Since the camera is slightly behind him he never knows exactly what’s framed- to add even more ambiguity to how he photographs he triggers the camera with a remote shutter release set with a two-second delay 
Each picture in this series is made at the same exact height- a comparison to Google street-view is probably inevitable but the personal diary nature of the project is there. He traverses the city and we are carried along for the ride. The sequences reflect the very act of moving around the city- a series of often non-moments that are punctuated with some interesting single images and mirrored self reflections- not to mention the stares from young children. Our Street View also includes an interesting repetitive element of the rail station attendants who assist him in and out of train cars with collapsible boards that bridge the platform gap. While he is noticed in the frames from time to time, one can’t help but feel invisible while viewing his pictures.
He shows us a world that’s obviously out there but not readily or even possibly seen by most people.  At the same time, I think Kanzaki’s wry ambivalence in attempting to advance a cause of any sort with his pictures is an important part of understanding the work. His sense of humor was apparent in the fact that his framed photographs were hung in the Nikon Salon at wheelchair level.
 

Ebisu

Mamiya C220 with 65mm f4.5 lens

Photographer: Hitoshi Kanzaki website / flickr / tumblr

I ran into Kansaki at Ebisu Garden Place near the Tokyo Metro Museum of Photography. I took a snap of his camera and we started chatting. He said he was going to Gallery Poetic Scape for the OU-en The So Books event since that was where I was headed as well we moved out and talked some more. He told me he had an exhibition at the Nikon Salon in Shinjuku in January of his street photographs-  titled Our Street View and just happened to have his portfolio from the show on him. 

You can and should check out his series on his site here: Our Street View

While he mostly shoots film (check him out on Flickr), for his Our Street View series Kanzaki attaches a small digital camera to the right handle of his wheelchair pointed ahead over his shoulder. Since the camera is slightly behind him he never knows exactly what’s framed- to add even more ambiguity to how he photographs he triggers the camera with a remote shutter release set with a two-second delay 

Each picture in this series is made at the same exact height- a comparison to Google street-view is probably inevitable but the personal diary nature of the project is there. He traverses the city and we are carried along for the ride. The sequences reflect the very act of moving around the city- a series of often non-moments that are punctuated with some interesting single images and mirrored self reflections- not to mention the stares from young children. Our Street View also includes an interesting repetitive element of the rail station attendants who assist him in and out of train cars with collapsible boards that bridge the platform gap. While he is noticed in the frames from time to time, one can’t help but feel invisible while viewing his pictures.

He shows us a world that’s obviously out there but not readily or even possibly seen by most people.  At the same time, I think Kanzaki’s wry ambivalence in attempting to advance a cause of any sort with his pictures is an important part of understanding the work. His sense of humor was apparent in the fact that his framed photographs were hung in the Nikon Salon at wheelchair level.

 

Sep 16 2014
Tokyo Leica Style
Top left: Leica M2 with 35mm f2 Summicron lens / Tumblr: Photografuji
Top right: Leica M4 with 50mm f2 Summicron lens
Bottom: Leica MP with 35mm f2 Summicron-Asph lens

Tokyo Leica Style

Top left: Leica M2 with 35mm f2 Summicron lens / Tumblr: Photografuji

Top right: Leica M4 with 50mm f2 Summicron lens

Bottom: Leica MP with 35mm f2 Summicron-Asph lens

Sep 15 2014
Nakameguro
Leica couple
Him: Leica M2 with 35mm f2 Summicron lens / Tumblr: Photografuji
Her: Leica M4 with 50mm f2 Summicron lens

Nakameguro

Leica couple

Him: Leica M2 with 35mm f2 Summicron lens / Tumblr: Photografuji

Her: Leica M4 with 50mm f2 Summicron lens

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gouldbookbinder:

Wish I had been to the photobook sale for the benefit of So Books in Tokyo last week-end. Hopefully, I’m so grateful my friend Kyoko made it for me!

The sale was a success :

https://www.facebook.com/S0B00KS/posts/835663923132967

All photos (c) Kyoko Kasuya

Via Cristophe in France by way of Tokyo- more pics of the SO BOOKS benefit event. 

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OU-en THE SO BOOKS, a two-day event to support a well loved and locally owned Art & Photo bookshop, was held at Gallery Poetic Scape in Nakameguro this weekend.

A rainstorm in June of this year flooded the back room of  SO BOOKS (website) resulting in a truck load’s worth loss of inventory. A photo of all of the ruined rare books can be seen at the top of the event’s tumblr and facebook page. Since So Books is so respected in the photography and publishing community, Atsushi Saito of Roshin BooksTakayuki Kobayashi of flotsam books, and photographer Hiroshi Nomura got together to create a fundraising event to help the store’s owner, Ikuo Ogawasara with the setback that the water damage caused.

A benefit sale was planned and a network of photographers, editors, writers, and publishers was invited to donate of photobooks and prints for the cause. In addition to helping out a treasure of the city the sale was an excellent chance to get some super good deals on artwork and books. I was happy and humbled that both of the prints I donated were sold- You can see all that was available on the event’s tumblr ouenthesobooks.tumblr.com .Additionally there was a call for photos for the production of a commemorative zine for the event which you can see some images of above.

Tokyo is a city full of excellent bookshops but I think that an event like OU-en THE SO BOOKS demonstrates not just how special and important this particular bookshop- one so excellently curated and kindly staffed- is to so many people.  

Long live SO BOOKS

Sep 14 2014
Outside Totem Pole Photo Gallery, Shinjuku
Minolta Autocord
Photographer: aya77.tumblr.com

Outside Totem Pole Photo Gallery, Shinjuku

Minolta Autocord

Photographer: aya77.tumblr.com

Sep 13 2014
Outside Totem Pole Photo Gallery, Shinjuku
Voigtlander Vito II

Outside Totem Pole Photo Gallery, Shinjuku

Voigtlander Vito II

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Outside Totem Pole Photo Gallery, Shinjuku
Rolleiflex T 3.5

Outside Totem Pole Photo Gallery, Shinjuku

Rolleiflex T 3.5

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Seen: Eye of The Vortex

Who: Eric  エリック / portfolio site: ericolour.com

Where: Guardian Garden, Ginza

When: Sept. 8 - 25th, 11am - 7pm (closed Sundays)

Eric, a Hong Kong born photographer who goes simply by his first name, is currently having his dizzyingly saturated colorful photographs of India at Guardian Garden in Ginza.  While viewing the images at the opening last night I was struck by the fact that these are images that only Eric could make. His use of a Leica + a flash + strangers in a foreign country isn’t applied in hopes of gaining notoriety or a buzz online- instead he uses his tools to create some of the best current street work out there, having some excellent photobooks published along the way.

While you can see almost every image from this series on his website, the accompanying photobook, published by Akaaka, is an even better way to spend time enjoying all the details which permeate his frames. Seeing all the prints in person however, is an entirely different affair. Every shot was taken with his Leica M7 on Kodak film, and every print in the show was hand printed in his color darkroom. In only two days, he told me. Eric is a very good and efficient printer.  He doesn’t need a negative scanner or an inkjet printer to do what he does. 

You can see more instillation views of the show here. This is a great show and one well worth checking out in Tokyo this month. 

Sep 12 2014
Totem Pole Photo Gallery, Shinjuku
Nikon F70 with Nikkor 35-80mm f4-5.6 D AF lens

Totem Pole Photo Gallery, Shinjuku

Nikon F70 with Nikkor 35-80mm f4-5.6 D AF lens

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写真家のJohn Sypalよりご寄贈いただきました!

ouenthesobooks:

写真家のJohn Sypal(ジョン・サイパル)さんからネブラスカで撮ったプリントをご寄贈頂きました!

My contribution to the So Books support sale thus weekend in Tokyo is these two prints from my Nebraska series.

Photographers and photography lovers from all over the country and even the world have kindly donated photobooks and prints for a fundraising sale this weekend in Naka Meguro to help support this locally owned and well loved store after it’s disastrous loss of stock due to flooding this past June. You can see what will be available from the tumble from which this image was reblogged.

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Totem Pole Photo Gallery
Leica Ig with Voigtlander 25mm f4 Snapshot-Skopar lens
Photographer: IM/AMOTO / tumblr

Totem Pole Photo Gallery

Leica Ig with Voigtlander 25mm f4 Snapshot-Skopar lens

Photographer: IM/AMOTO / tumblr

Sep 11 2014
3rd District Gallery, Shinjuku
Ricoh GR1v
Photographer: Tomona Hayashi at her exhibition, The End of Qi

3rd District Gallery, Shinjuku

Ricoh GR1v

Photographer: Tomona Hayashi at her exhibition, The End of Qi

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