tokyo camera style

Aug 27 2014
Yodobashi Camera film department, Shinjuku
Leica MP à la carte with 50mm f2 Summicron lens
He told me he ordered this camera to celebrate his 30th birthday- he said he wanted a camera for life.  

Yodobashi Camera film department, Shinjuku

Leica MP à la carte with 50mm f2 Summicron lens

He told me he ordered this camera to celebrate his 30th birthday- he said he wanted a camera for life.  

Aug 26 2014
Totem Pole Photo Gallery, Shinjuku
Nikon F100 with 50mm f1.8D AF lens
Photographer: Cueisao / tumblr

Totem Pole Photo Gallery, Shinjuku

Nikon F100 with 50mm f1.8D AF lens

Photographer: Cueisaotumblr

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Selected promotional postcards for photography exhibitions and events in Tokyo (and one in Hokkaido), September, 2014.  This set includes two separate Daido Moriyama shows.

Aug 25 2014

Ray of Grade Select asked if I was interested in doing a collaborative T-shirt.   Why not?   It turned out pretty cool. It’s got this picture from Nov.1, 2011 on it.  

You can order yours at Grade Select HERE.  

Note: Shirts do not include a Leica or my cat, who naturally decided that the best possible place in my apartment to lay down on at that moment was this shirt as I started to photograph it.

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Now showing: Zuisha vol.8  

Where: Totem Pole Photo Gallery, Shinjuku (map)

When: August 26 - September 7th, 2014 / 12-7pm (closed Mondays)

What: Twenty-one fiber prints made as best as possible from what turned out to be a batch of Oriental FB Seagull paper with emulsion problems. This ongoing series remains an experiment and a way of working.

Aug 24 2014
I’ve been going past Lucky Camera in Shinjuku since 2001- I even bought my first rangefinder there in 2002 (a Bessa R2) and my first Leica (M6TTL) in 2004. I can’t believe that in thirteen years I never noticed that their Fujifilm Fujicolor sign had a misspelling. Actually, this is their old location- they moved to a new shop near Isetan in Shinjuku earlier this year. You can check out Lucky Camera online here: lucky-camera.com/english
As for “Camara”, when the shop window looked like this, there wasn’t much reason to look anywhere else.

I’ve been going past Lucky Camera in Shinjuku since 2001- I even bought my first rangefinder there in 2002 (a Bessa R2) and my first Leica (M6TTL) in 2004. I can’t believe that in thirteen years I never noticed that their Fujifilm Fujicolor sign had a misspelling. Actually, this is their old location- they moved to a new shop near Isetan in Shinjuku earlier this year. You can check out Lucky Camera online here: lucky-camera.com/english

As for “Camara”, when the shop window looked like this, there wasn’t much reason to look anywhere else.

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Seen: Yangon

Who: Yoshihito Muta 

Where: 3rd District Gallery, Shinjuku

When: August 15 - 24, 2014 / 1pm-8pm

Muta is one of 3rd District’s members and has been holding several exhibitions of his work each year there since 2009. On his profile page (link) you can see samples of his work by clicking on the dates or titles of the shows- then click on the sample image to bring up the larger sized scrolling online galleries. A great example of his Tokyo street work is the wonderfully titled “since 1988 lookin’ for the face" series.

Yangon is also known as Rangoon in English. The show is made up of images he took to Burma just this past June- about six or seven weeks before the show. He said in his statement that he leisurely walked around with ten rolls of film and had no objective or timetable of any kind.  The pictures reflect this mindset.

Interestingly, for the show Muta printed not just the entire 35mm frame, but also the surrounding edges including the sprocket holes of the film. Laying bare the physical element of the material used to make these pictures like this possibly correlates to the openness of the town and the people he photographed. He’s not using artifice to enhance his idea of a place, but rather through transparency shows he has nothing to hide. The place and his pictures are good enough as is. 

Aug 23 2014
While walking in Ginza I ran into my friend Narashige Matsuki and his wife, Yumiko.  He was packing his Plaubel Makina 6x7 rangefinder (top) and Leica M4-P (left). We got coffee and got caught up- since we all last met the two of them took a trip to LA and the American southwest. I love how intimate and personal his pictures are. This picture from their trip is so great. 
To all you millions of 17 year old art and design students* on this site, I really suggest following him on tumblr. He’s making pictures that you will like. He’s making pictures that can really teach you something about photography. Don’t think that you need to detach yourself emotionally from your photos! Figure out what makes you (and who you’re with) what you are, and go from there.
*and everyone else

While walking in Ginza I ran into my friend Narashige Matsuki and his wife, Yumiko.  He was packing his Plaubel Makina 6x7 rangefinder (top) and Leica M4-P (left). We got coffee and got caught up- since we all last met the two of them took a trip to LA and the American southwest. I love how intimate and personal his pictures are. This picture from their trip is so great. 

To all you millions of 17 year old art and design students* on this site, I really suggest following him on tumblr. He’s making pictures that you will like. He’s making pictures that can really teach you something about photography. Don’t think that you need to detach yourself emotionally from your photos! Figure out what makes you (and who you’re with) what you are, and go from there.

*and everyone else

Aug 21 2014
Ginza
Leica M4-P with 50mm f2 Summicron lens and half case
The young woman holding this Leica is Yumiko (website / tumblr) and while this camera actually belongs to her husband, Narishige (who lovingly and almost exclusively photographs his wife), she takes pictures as well. 

Ginza

Leica M4-P with 50mm f2 Summicron lens and half case

The young woman holding this Leica is Yumiko (website / tumblr) and while this camera actually belongs to her husband, Narishige (who lovingly and almost exclusively photographs his wife), she takes pictures as well. 

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Ginza
Plaubel Makina 67
Photographer: Matsuki Narishige   Tumblr / Flickr / Instagram / Blog

Ginza

Plaubel Makina 67

Photographer: Matsuki Narishige   Tumblr / Flickr / Instagram / Blog

Aug 20 2014

Tokyo Darkroom Style 3

Giovanni Pascarella, a postdoc researcher arrived in Japan in 2010 and when not investigating on the effect of neurodegeneration on DNA in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases spends his spare time making photographs. Recently, he has began printing in the darkroom. He tells us that…

As you can see it’s a very minimal set-up, both for space constraints and because I just started printing a few months ago and being a beginner my needs in terms of equipment are low. Around my enlarger I have a timer, contrast filters, some improvised tools for dodging and burning, and a speaker to fill my printing sessions with some good tunes (lately it’s mostly Mogwai and other post-rock bands).
Before making the commitment to purchase this equipment I wondered for some time whether it wasn’t just better to rent one of the darkrooms available around Tokyo or Yokohama. But in the end I decided to go with my own darkroom mainly because of convenience: I can print whenever I want and it takes only 10-15 minutes to prepare everything. However I’ve found that I need to be fresh and relaxed in order to produce good results. Therefore I print only on the weekends. I got most of the equipment from Yahoo Auction Japan. With a bit of luck you can find some very good deals there for darkroom stuff…the enlarger itself cost me just 2.000 yen! (about $20 USD) 
I’m currently reading and studying a lot about basic printing techniques. It’s been quite a relief to discover that Internet is still a very powerful resource for darkroom learning material, and there are several active forums focused on traditional photography from which it’s easy to get answers for even the most detailed questions in a short time. Classic books from master printers are also readily available on Amazon, most of the times second-hand and for very reasonable prices. 
Getting into printing has been the best things that happened to my photography since going back to my film roots last year, and I actually have to thank you, Jesse and the other people from the community for encouraging me to do so (even a few words sometimes can be a powerful primer). My awareness of light and composition are greatly benefiting from this experience and although the process of shaping a photograph from my mind on the paper can be frustrating at times (well, most of the time) having in my hands the final print always fully repays me of everything.
I think that he’s on to something with that last line. Prints do indeed seem to have an intrinsic value that makes all the investments of money, time, and effort worth it in the end.
Online you can see Giovanni’s work on Tumblr, Flickr, and his own portfolio site giovannipascarella.com
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Previous Tokyo Darkroom Style entries:  Darkroom 1 / Darkroom 2
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A scan of the July 2014 Tokyo Camera Style monthly feature in Nippon Camera
My editor and I went to meet Issei Suda (right) at his exhibition in June at a gallery called Wadagarou over near Ginza. I had met him once before at an opening reception at PGI a few years ago and again last September at his massive retrospective Fragments of Calm at the Tokyo Metro Museum of Photography. A fantastic (and fantastically prodigious) photographer who has had some recent  re-releases of his photo books, Suda Issei is finally getting some of the exposure abroad which he deserves. If you’re not familiar with the man, listen up: He’s one of the best street photographers you’ve never heard of.  Of his books, I recommend Minyou Sangaand Waga Tokyo 100 in particular but his retrospective exhibition catalogue Fragments of Calm is an affordable overview of his work which I’ve talked about on this blog before. 
As for the left hand page, I photographed everyone on the same sunny day in May.  The bottom two pictures are people I met at Kameido Tenjin (a really great environment for shooting) during that shrine’s Wisteria festival. The top two photos were taken a little later at Nezu Shrine, during that shrine’s azalea festival. Interestingly, I ran into the couple in the frame at the bottom right again in Nezu. Small town Toyko. 

A scan of the July 2014 Tokyo Camera Style monthly feature in Nippon Camera

My editor and I went to meet Issei Suda (right) at his exhibition in June at a gallery called Wadagarou over near Ginza. I had met him once before at an opening reception at PGI a few years ago and again last September at his massive retrospective Fragments of Calm at the Tokyo Metro Museum of Photography. A fantastic (and fantastically prodigious) photographer who has had some recent  re-releases of his photo books, Suda Issei is finally getting some of the exposure abroad which he deserves. If you’re not familiar with the man, listen up: He’s one of the best street photographers you’ve never heard of.  Of his books, I recommend Minyou Sangaand Waga Tokyo 100 in particular but his retrospective exhibition catalogue Fragments of Calm is an affordable overview of his work which I’ve talked about on this blog before

As for the left hand page, I photographed everyone on the same sunny day in May.  The bottom two pictures are people I met at Kameido Tenjin (a really great environment for shooting) during that shrine’s Wisteria festival. The top two photos were taken a little later at Nezu Shrine, during that shrine’s azalea festival. Interestingly, I ran into the couple in the frame at the bottom right again in Nezu. Small town Toyko. 

Aug 19 2014
Nihombashi
Leica M4-2 with 50mm f3.5 Elmar lens and Leica handgrip
Photographer: Issei Suda (website / photobooks)

Nihombashi

Leica M4-2 with 50mm f3.5 Elmar lens and Leica handgrip

Photographer: Issei Suda (website / photobooks)

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Nezu Shrine
Mamiya C3 with 105mm f3.5 lens

Nezu Shrine

Mamiya C3 with 105mm f3.5 lens

Aug 18 2014
Nezu Shrine
Nikon F90 with 50mm f1.4 lens

Nezu Shrine

Nikon F90 with 50mm f1.4 lens

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